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"6 Rude Things Moms Let Their Kids Do (Tsk Tsk)" & My Response

 

Posted by Kristina Blizzard on December 27, 2012

I read an article on Facebook entitled "6 Rude Things Moms Let Their Kids Do (Tsk Tsk)" and I thought I'd share it with you, as well as my response to it.

 

Here is a link to the original article:

 

http://thestir.cafemom.com/big_kid/118432/6_rude_things_moms_let

 

This is my response:

 

I vaguely remember when I was also young, childless, self righteous, and suffered from a lack of humility, understanding and charity towards others. Life has taught me a lot since then. It is important to understand that not all kids have an equal capacity for self control, or the ability to comprehend the social graces you smugly demand of them. Some real and very challenging issues are not physically visible. Many people are quick to judge what they can not even begin to understand. You can not know what any of those kids, or parents are dealing with on a daily basis. I am sure I didn't understand before I was the parent of two kids on the autism spectrum. I understand a lot more now. I know some of those kids have sensory dysfunction that makes going into places like a grocery store seem overwhelming and maybe even physically painful. I know some of those kids have worked for years to learn to do things that came very easily to you, things that you take for granted. I know that many of these parents have gone to great lengths to try to avoid the situations, and things that might cause a meltdown. Sometimes we don't know what is bothering our kids, and their communication deficits can make it impossible for them to explain it to us. Maybe you think we should shield you from our kids and their seemilngly unforgivable behavior. Unfortunately, the babysitter isn't always available when we run out of groceries, and our kids need to practice being out in public. Our kids are trying very hard to fit into a world build by typical people for typical people. Despite our best efforts, we can't protect our kids from your unreasonable expectations, so we hope and pray they don't notice your openly disapproving stares and comments. Our kids suffer from a great deal of rejection, stigma and bigotry. They just want the same things we alll want, understanding, and acceptance. If it is beyond you to give that to them, then perhaps it is you who do not belong out in public!

 

 

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